007’s Grooming Routine

There's no denying that James Bond is an expertly groomed fellow. But 23 films in, we still don't have many details about 007's routine. We've got some bits and pieces: In Goldfinger he uses a Gillette safety razor (with tracking device hidden in the handle) on a plane. And there's the Norelco Spectra 8894XL shaver in Die Another Day (huzzah product placement!). And Bond uses Pinaud Elixer Shampoo in the Ian Fleming novel On Her Majesty's Secret Service (all this Bond grooming intel is thanks to JamesBondLifeStyle.com. And of course, there's the [007 fragrance] itself (which, tragically, doesn't seem like anything Bond would actually roll with). In honor of Skyfall's release (which reveals a scruffier side of 007), we offer up a signature sink or shower item for each big screen Bond.

Sean Connery

Sean Connery

For many, Sean Connery is James Bond, and vice versa. The Scotsman had the advantage of originating the role, of course, and was responsible for many of the series' most memorable films (Dr. No, From Russie With Love, Goldfinger), but there's no denying that Connery had just the perfect mix of charm and masculine power. Mr. Natty Jack Tar's Bay Rum After Shave makes a similarly invigorating first impression, and the scent of bay leaves and rum would not be out-of-place in Connery's adopted homeland of the Bahamas.

George Lazenby

George Lazenby
The Australian George Lazenby made his big-screen debut in 1969's On Her Majesty's Secret Service after impressing the producers with his fighting ability—he accidentally punched the film's stunt coordinator in the face. Lazenby left the franchise after one movie (Connery returned for Diamonds Are Forever), but his contribution was one of the best Bond flicks, and most fans agree that he was the best at hand-to-hand combat. While we don't necessarily condone physical violence, we can recommend AHAVA's Dermud Hand Cream to get your hands back in shape no matter what you put them through.

Roger Moore

Roger Moore
Roger Moore stepped into Connery's shoes for 1973's Live and Let Die and would go on to make six more Bond movies in the next 12 years. His run was marked by questionable attempts to leaven the series with humor, and efforts to set Moore's Bond drastically apart from Connery's already-iconic performances. Moore began filming Live and Let Die well into his forties, and was 57 when his final Bond film, A View to a Kill, was released in 1985, so we suspect he had something along the lines of ZIRH REVERSE™ anti-aging serum hidden away somewhere. It helps you look fresh even after years fighting bad guys.

Timothy Dalton

Timothy Dalton
The classically trained theater actor Timothy Dalton took on the role of Bond for only two films, the darker, more viscerally powerful The Living Daylights and Licence to Kill. Dalton's performance marked a return to seriousness after Moore's playful tenure, bringing new psychological depth to a series that had previously been focused on gadgets and girls. The Living Daylights took Bond to the Mojave Desert and the Sahara in Morocco, while Licence to Kill was shot entirely in Mexico and Florida, so we hope he kept a tough, water- and sweat-resistant sunblock like Kiehl's Facial Fuel UV Guard SPF 50+ handy. Because even international globe-hopping spies need to worry about skin cancer.

Pierce Brosnan

Pierce Bronsnan
Pierce Brosnan had originally been cast to take over from Moore, but was contractually obligated to continue in his role on television's Remington Steele after it was brought back from cancellation. It was well over half a decade after the release of Licence to Kill that Brosnan made his Bond debut in GoldenEye, and the success of the film quashed any questions about the franchise's continued relevance in a post-Cold War era. Brosnan would help bring the series into the new millennium with 1999's The World Is Not Enough and 2002's Die Another Day, before officially leaving in 2004. He is probably best remembered for his lustrous, thick hair that was always perfectly in place. Keep your own coif under control with Oribe's Original Pomade, which also adds a little bit of extra shine.

Daniel Craig

Daniel Craig
Daniel Craig is in many ways a Bond for our times: smoother, sharper, sleeker, yet more sensitive and stripped of distracting flourishes. The announcement of Craig's casting was met with one of the most passionate outcries in the history of the franchise, but through Casino Royale, Quantum of Solace, and now Skyfall, he has more than proven himself. Craig's run has proven to be a refreshingly contemporary take on the Bond series, in line with the darker and more psychologically blunt action films of the past few years. The Protective Matte Moisturizer from Ernest Supplies offers the same sort of updated take on a classic for a new age, offering everything you need and nothing more.

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