3 Ways to Rock Blue Eye Shadow for All Skin Tones

Once the ‘80s concluded their joyful run, blue eye shadow was pretty much relegated to the dustbin of history. Or so we thought. Like a phoenix, the trend has risen again—look no further than Gwen Stefani, Ginnifer Goodwin, and Coco Rocha for evidence. To learn how to make the trend wearable on all skin tones, we turned to makeup artist Nico Guilis, who has worked with fashion heavy-hitters like Dree Hemingway, Bar Rafaeli, Poppy Delevingne, and Lily Kwong, and who is “loving blue eye products this spring and summer season.”

Light

Before you think about shadow, apply a color-correcting primer like Benefit's Stay Don't Stray (this works for all skin tones) to give you an even canvas. Guilis recommends using a shade that won't overpower your complexion—think cool periwinkles or a silvery grey-blue. MAKE Satin Finish Eyeshadow in Blue Toile is a great contender. "To complement the blue, use a bronzer on the cheeks in lieu of a blush—it will give a warm softness to your look," she says. Go for a shimmer-free option like Cargo Bronzer in Light.

Medium

A turquoise hue sets off warmer skintones. "Use a blue eyeliner in the waterline and smudge it out to get that Tahitian island look," Guilis says. "One of my favorite tricks is smudging a frosty blue pencil over a cinnamon brown or navy blue shadow—it looks awesome for a sexy evening look." Another date night-worthy touch is adding a shimmery shadow like Chantecaille Papillons Eye Shade to the inner corners of the eyes.

Dark

Next time you go for a smoky eye, Guilis suggests swapping the usual black for a bold midnight or cobalt like NARS Outremer, which will radiate on dark skin tones. Too bright? Try Alima Pure™ Luminous Shimmer Eyeshadow in Navy. "Pair your bright eyes with a beautiful rose or warm blush," she says. We love Alima Pure™ Satin Matte Blush in Antique Rose. "A darker complexion can hold a warmer color on the cheeks. It brings out great definition.” You can also try a red or pink lip instead of blush. “There always needs to be a balance," Guilis says.

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