Get Off the Bottle: 5 Non-Messy Alternatives to Goopy and Sloppy Sun Protection

They say you should apply a shot glass worth of sunscreen to ensure proper protection. So does that mean you’ve got to tote a handle if you’re going on vacation? We’d much rather opt for a couple streamlined alternatives without sacrificing potency of protection. If you’re tired of big-bottle sunscreens that take up valuable counter space and explode in your suitcase, you’ll want to try these travel-friendly alternatives for clean, efficient, and portable protection.

Stick it to the Sun

A sun stick, which functions similarly to your trusty stick deodorant, allows effortless distribution of SPF without gunking up your tote or attracting lots of sand granule hangers-on. A stick like Supergoop!’s is equipped with aloe vera and essential oils that prevent skin from drying out. When you need another quick coat of anti-sun protection, it’ll be easy to get a grip and let glide.

Spray Some SPF

An easy alternative to arduous squeezing and spreading is a simple spray job. With a twisting lock closure, this "Sunscreen Mist" from Supergoop! is totally spill-proof and comes with a healthy dose of Vitamin C to boot.

Made in the Shade Shirt

Sure, you have to be “that guy” swimming and sun bathing in a long sleeve shirt, but it’s better than nursing lobster-red limbs at dinner. Nothing will protect you better than a special sun protection shirt.

Treat Your Face

If you moisturize with hefty SPF on your face, you can avoid toting a big bottle of goop altogether. Give your mug the royal treatment with at least SPF 30 and you’re good to go (the leap from SPF 15 to 30 is perhaps the most crucial one as SPF 15 blocks 93 percent of UVB rays, while SPF 30 blocks 97 percent of UVB rays). Try COOLA’s natural and cucumber-scented moisturizer.

Solar Constant / SPF in a Pill

Considering scientists have come up with inhalable coffee and sprayable vitamins, it’s safe to say a sunscreen you can swallow isn’t too far off. Researchers at King’s College in London recently discovered that the algae living in tropical coral creates a compound responsible for providing broad-spectrum protection. It might take five years, but safe to say the future of sun protection is looking a lot less messy.

Photo: FX

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