How to: Make Your Fragrance Last Longer

Fragrance, while transporting, is often fleeting. How often have you misted yourself with your favorite scent only to have it vanish by the time you get to work? Don’t throw out that bottle just yet! For starters, read our guide to fragrance terminology and make sure you’re wearing a perfume or eau de parfum, which has the highest concentration of essential oils. Then, read on to find out how two fragrance industry pros—Christina Kucukyan of Juliette Has a Gun and Mandy Aftel, creator of Aftelier Perfumes and author of the upcoming Fragrant—make sure their scents last and last.

Store Wisely

When it comes to storing fragrances, it’s all about location, location, location. In other words, advises Kucukyan, “Don’t keep [your perfume] in your car.” Instead, stow scents in a cool, dry place away from the sun, like your bathroom cabinet. If you want to showcase your collection—and with designs like this or this, who can resist?—make sure to keep them on a shelf away from your window.

Spray Strategically

We all know the basics of fragrance application—a splash to the wrists, a dash behind the ears—but if your goal is staying power, you may want to consider some less orthodox spots. Kucukyan recommends the stomach and the back of the neck, heat-radiating zones that keep your scent alive through the day. Aftel loves to mist her hair, which acts as a fixative for your favorite scent (haven’t you ever noticed how your favorite shampoo tends to linger?). Finally, take a lead from the French, whose philosophy strikes us as incredibly sound: “Spray where you want to be kissed.”

Layer for Longevity

Wearing multiple fragrances can get complicated, but it’s a great way to prolong the life of your favorite scent. One trick, says Aftel, is to layer a liquid scent like Joie's Folle de Joie on top of lightly scented body oil like Caudalie’s Divine Oil, which creates a base for your liquid scent to hold onto. Another option? Combine a solid fragrance, like this one from Mox Botanicals, with your liquid scent.

Re-Apply Judiciously

Lastly, consider warming up to the idea that fragrances weren’t meant to last forever. In fact, there’s something romantic about the reapplication process, which Aftel likens to “taking a minivacation.” What could be better at the end of a long workday?

comments powered by Disqus