Why Moisturizing Matters

You wouldn’t go a day without drinking water, right? (Note: Coffee and beer contain lots of water.) Well, you shouldn’t go a day without hydrating your skin. It’s not just meant to help you today—the benefits of hydrating your skin will be visible years in the future. Here are the most important reasons to keep moisturizer close at hand.

Today

In the short term, proper hydration makes skin look healthy. Many moisturizers use ingredients like caffeine to deliver immediate perking and plumping benefits (the stuff you want after a rough night), but in general, moisturizers lock in water with ingredients like “occlusives,” which prevent water loss in heat or wind, “humectants,” which attract water to skin cells, and “emollients,” which smooth rough and flaking skin. A day after using facial lotion you’ll find skin is smoother, softer, and fresher-looking.

Tomorrow

Using moisturizer has proven benefits for the skin over the long haul. Hydration is what allows skin to function at peak performance. Skin cells in this condition can rapidly repair themselves and turnover fresh cells, which means huge anti-aging benefits down the road. In this study from the British Journal of Dermatology, those who used moisturizer were found to develop wrinkles at a fraction of the rate of those with dry skin. For men, moisturizing is particularly important. In another study, researchers found that being a male makes one more likely to show signs of aging.

It Feels Awesome

If the above wasn’t enough to compel you to moisturize, consider this: it’s insanely refreshing. Along with a quick teeth brushing, there’s no better way to transition from the office to the bar. While there are options for every skin concern, you really can’t go wrong: any moisturizer at all is better than none. For a tried-and-true standard, give BENTA BERRY's Super Moisturizing Face Cream a try. If anti-aging is a prime concern, consider Clark’s Botanicals Smoothing Marine Cream, an emollient and brightening formula that also fights inflammation.

Eric Neher

comments powered by Disqus